Video shows massive dust cloud shrouding farming community outside San Diego

Wild videos show a massive wind-driven dust storm shrouding a farming community outside San Diego – reducing driving visibility to zero on the roads and paralyzing the area for hours

  • Residents of Southern California were urged to take shelter Thursday as a large cloud of dust known as a haboob swept through the region.
  • The cloud was created by a major thunderstorm in Yuma, Arizona, which created significant outflow winds that pushed dust towards California
  • A haboob is a type of intense dust storm that moves thanks to an atmospheric gravity current, they usually occur in desert environments

The National Weather Service issued a dust storm warning for San Diego County Thursday afternoon.

The warning was in effect from approximately 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. local time for communities along Interstate 8, which connects Yuma, Arizona, to San Diego.

The storm resulted in zero visibility. This prompted the NWS to warn against attempting to ride out the storm. The warning also affected neighboring Riverside County.

A camera installed by the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District at Monument Peak showed the cloud heading toward the town of Ocotillo.

The NWS warning read in part: “Visibility could drop to one mile in blowing dust and sand and could briefly drop to less than a quarter mile in local areas.”

He added: “Be alert to rapidly changing weather conditions.”

Meteorologist Adam Roser said the storm was caused by a thunderstorm in Yuma, Arizona. That storm created “strong outflow winds” that pushed into California, reports the Desert Post.

A witness to the cloud, La Quinta High School coach Matt Ward, told the newspaper, “It was crazy. Everyone said the same thing when it happened, it felt like we were in a movie there.

A cloud of dust invades a neighborhood outside of San Diego

The NWS warning said in part:

The NWS warning said in part: ‘Visibility could drop up to a mile in blowing dust and sand and could drop briefly to less than a quarter mile in local areas’

The National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration says haboobs last about 10 to 30 minutes

The National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration says haboobs last about 10 to 30 minutes

Adam Roser said, “It’s definitely an interesting event.” He described the cloud as a “haboob”. He recommended people stay indoors until the cloud clears.

A haboob is a type of intense dust storm that moves thanks to an atmospheric gravity current. They usually occur in dry desert areas.

The National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration says haboobs last about 10 to 30 minutes. The dust walls created by the front can reach 10,000 feet.

The word comes from the Arabic word haab, which means wind.

According to the NWS, the wind speed in the area around San Diego County was around 15 to 20 mph with gusts of 30 mph.

Weather experts say haboobs occur frequently during the summer monsoon season in the southwestern United States.

This is when thunderstorms produce downdrafts that can lift dry, loose sand onto the desert floor, creating a wall of dust that moves outward, covering an area much larger than the desert floor. storm itself, according to senior meteorologist Jim Andrews on Accuweather.com.

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